Breaking Down Breakfast Time

Answering the big questions..

Is it really ๐˜ต๐˜ฉ๐˜ฆ most important meal of the day?
What does a healthy brekkie look like?
What other factors are there at brekkie time other than just the foods we eat?
Breakfast ideas for fussy and restricted eaters?

and more in this blog!


๐—œ๐˜€ ๐—ถ๐˜ ๐—ฒ๐˜€๐˜€๐—ฒ๐—ป๐˜๐—ถ๐—ฎ๐—น ๐˜๐—ผ ๐—ฒ๐—ฎ๐˜ ๐—ฎ ๐—ต๐—ฎ๐—ฟ๐—ฑ๐˜† ๐—ฏ๐—ฟ๐—ฒ๐—ธ๐—ธ๐—ถ๐—ฒ ๐—ฒ๐˜ƒ๐—ฒ๐—ฟ๐˜† ๐—บ๐—ผ๐—ฟ๐—ป๐—ถ๐—ป๐—ด?

That’s a controversial question in the health realm for sure! Some say it is, some say it’s good to skip it and continue the fast from throughout the night into later in the day.

In all of my years learning about and living the Primal way I’ve definitely come to the understanding that breakfast is an important time to eat, for most of us, if not all of us.

Let’s look at why brekkie is an important meal, thanks to the wisdom of Mark Sisson of Mark’s Daily Appleโ€ฆ

“Breakfast is When You Break Your Fast

Historically, breakfast was a term used to describe your first meal of the day, no matter when that meal took place. Sometime around the 15th century, it became synonymous with the meal you consume shortly after waking up. And now, thanks to the hundreds of thousands of people thriving with intermittent fasting, breakfast is returning to its first-meal-of-your-day roots.

Simply put, breakfast is how you break your fast.

Whether you have a planned eating window or your fast is just the hours that youโ€™re asleep, the meal that answers the dayโ€™s first call of hunger is arguably the most important.

Let me repeat that: your first hunger of the day is the most important.

Itโ€™s your bodyโ€™s first polite request for you to deliver substantial, supportive, and sustainable fuel to your body.

Benefits may include:

  • Your cravings disappear
  • Youโ€™re not thinking about food 24/7
  • You have more sustained energy
  • You stop snacking all day
  • You sleep better at night
  • Youโ€™re not spiralling into guilt or shame because you binged once the sun went down”

I 100% feel my best when I’m eating a good meal in the morning. Not necessarily right away, or as my first ‘activity’ but definitely eating brekkie is my jam. Pun intended, cos, I love puns! Brekkie helps fuel my brain for funnier puns too.. haha


๐—ข๐—ธ, ๐˜€๐—ผ ๐˜„๐—ฒ ๐—ธ๐—ป๐—ผ๐˜„ ๐—ป๐—ผ๐˜„ ๐—ฏ๐—ฟ๐—ฒ๐—ฎ๐—ธ๐—ณ๐—ฎ๐˜€๐˜ ๐—ถ๐˜€ ๐˜€๐˜‚๐—ฝ๐—ฒ๐—ฟ ๐—ถ๐—บ๐—ฝ๐—ผ๐—ฟ๐˜๐—ฎ๐—ป๐˜, ๐—ฏ๐˜‚๐˜ ๐˜„๐—ต๐—ฎ๐˜ ๐—ณ๐—ผ๐—ผ๐—ฑ๐˜€ ๐˜€๐—ต๐—ผ๐˜‚๐—น๐—ฑ ๐˜„๐—ฒ ๐—ป๐—ผ๐˜ ๐—ฒ๐—ฎ๐˜ ๐˜๐—ต๐—ฒ๐—ป?

Basically, what most of the world eats most mornings. Grain-based cereals, toast, sausages full of flours and other fake stuff, crappy bacon, tinned baked beans, acai bowls, fruit and greens smoothies, green juices, just a coffee, pastries, muesli bars, protein bars, regular pancakes and waffles, syrups, jam, vegemite, margarine… the list continues but I think that covers most of the standard breakfast options.

If you’re still not convinced that cereal, toast etc do not play a role in a healthy lifestyle (for kids or adults, anyone at any age) refer to our blog all about GRAINS for all the info to get educated.

Why aren’t liquids like smoothies and green juices a good idea? A main reason is that our digestion starts in the mouth when we CHEW our food. Drinking a meal isn’t good for the gut. Another reason is that greens, fruits etc are highly inflammatory and end up causing more problems than positives to our health.

Why aren’t bars healthy? They’re full of junk! Simple!

High fruit brekkies aren’t good for us, if there’s way more sugar than protein and fat.

A high carb meal first up is going to make us hungry again and have an energy drop within a few hours.


๐—œ๐—ด๐—ป๐—ผ๐—ฟ๐—ฒ ๐—ฐ๐—น๐—ฒ๐˜ƒ๐—ฒ๐—ฟ ๐—ฐ๐—ฒ๐—ฟ๐—ฒ๐—ฎ๐—น ๐—ฏ๐—ผ๐˜… ๐—บ๐—ฎ๐—ฟ๐—ธ๐—ฒ๐˜๐—ถ๐—ป๐—ด ๐—ฎ๐—ป๐—ฑ ‘๐—ฏ๐—ฟ๐—ฒ๐—ฎ๐—ฑ ๐˜„๐—ถ๐˜๐—ต ๐—ฎ๐—ฑ๐—ฑ๐—ฒ๐—ฑ ๐—ณ๐—ถ๐—ฏ๐—ฟ๐—ฒ ๐—ถ๐˜€ ๐—ต๐—ฒ๐—ฎ๐—น๐˜๐—ต๐˜†’ ๐—ฎ๐—ฑ๐˜€

๐—ง๐—›๐—œ๐—ฆ ๐—ถ๐˜€ ๐˜„๐—ต๐—ฎ๐˜ ๐—ฎ ๐—ต๐—ฒ๐—ฎ๐—น๐˜๐—ต๐˜† ๐—ฏ๐—ฟ๐—ฒ๐—ธ๐—ธ๐—ถ๐—ฒ ๐˜€๐—ต๐—ผ๐˜‚๐—น๐—ฑ ๐—น๐—ผ๐—ผ๐—ธ ๐—น๐—ถ๐—ธ๐—ฒโ€ฆ

Animal based. Honest to goodness. Eating meat, animal fat, gelatin/collagen, bone broth and eggs makes the basis of a nourishing start to the day. Animal protein and fat provides long-lasting energy, a high level of essential nutrients that are bio-available (meaning the human body knows how to process them properly and efficiently), and extremely low in (if any) anti-nutrients.

Meat muffins, leftovers from dinner, slow cooked meat, cold roasted meats, eggs done a kazillion different ways, meat waffles, mince patties, good quality bacon, bone broth, collagen/gelatin, cheeses (dairy and not) cooking in and adding beef fat, lard, ghee, butter… there are so many ways to have a nourishing and enjoyable animal-based brekkie meal.

Adding in a few other healthy low-inflammatory options like avocado, mushrooms, some veggies, and low-sugar fruits (e.g. berries) are great too. Even whole fruit jelly can be a great addition to breakfast meals.

Then the sometimes ingredients like coconut yoghurt, coconut cream/milk, honey or pure maple syrup, fruits, paleo flours turned into breads, cereals, waffles, pancakes etc.

It’s really not hard to switch from standard crappy options over to nutritious alternatives. It takes some effort, planning and time initially, a transition period, then getting used to it so it becomes the ‘norm’. We did it over a decade ago. And if Clint, who said “๐˜ ๐˜ค๐˜ฐ๐˜ถ๐˜ญ๐˜ฅ ๐˜ฏ๐˜ฆ๐˜ท๐˜ฆ๐˜ณ ๐˜จ๐˜ช๐˜ท๐˜ฆ ๐˜ถ๐˜ฑ ๐˜ฃ๐˜ณ๐˜ฆ๐˜ข๐˜ฅ” can do it, anyone can!


๐—” ๐—ด๐—ผ๐—ผ๐—ฑ ๐—ฏ๐—ฟ๐—ฒ๐—ธ๐—ธ๐—ถ๐—ฒ ๐—ถ๐˜€ ๐—ฎ๐—ฏ๐—ผ๐˜‚๐˜ ๐—บ๐—ผ๐—ฟ๐—ฒ ๐˜๐—ต๐—ฎ๐—ป ๐—ท๐˜‚๐˜€๐˜ ๐—ณ๐—ผ๐—ผ๐—ฑ!

It’s so sad that most of the world thinks a healthy breakfast consists of standard cereals such as cornflakes, sugary kids cereals, mueslis etc, wheat and grain-filled gluten-free toast, spreads, icky green drinks, fruit bowls and smoothies, conventional coffee (non organic) with regular highly processed milks (skim being the worst)…

When the actual healthy options are based on animal foods, low inflammatory whole foods and essential minerals. And a good start to the day is about so much more than just the foods we eat! How much outdoor time we get matters too. Sunrise (or as close to) light directly on our skin and in our eyes, our feet touching the earth, breathing in fresh air, moving our bodies.. it’s all super important on a regular basis.

Let’s start thinking about breakfast time in a more holistic and all-rounder approach. Instead of sitting around a table or in front of the TV eating junk and not doing anything else.

๐™’๐™๐™–๐™ฉ’๐™จ ๐™Š๐™‰๐™€ ๐™ฃ๐™š๐™ฌ ๐™๐™š๐™–๐™ก๐™ฉ๐™๐™ฎ ๐™จ๐™ฉ๐™š๐™ฅ ๐™ฎ๐™ค๐™ช ๐™˜๐™–๐™ฃ ๐™ฉ๐™–๐™ ๐™š ๐™›๐™ค๐™ง ๐™– ๐™—๐™š๐™ฉ๐™ฉ๐™š๐™ง ๐™—๐™ง๐™š๐™ ๐™ ๐™ž๐™š ๐™ฉ๐™ž๐™ข๐™š?


What we do + eat at breakfast time

#1: Consume Sole on an empty stomach (mineral salt drenched water in a glass of water to remineralise the body)

#2: Outdoor time barefoot, moving, getting fresh air.

#3: Early sunshine directly in the eyes and on the skin.

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#4: Eating a nourishing animal-based brekkie meal.

That’s what we do most days of the week to turn our get-up-and-go hormones kicking in, to fuel us, and to keep us full and productive all morning.


Recipe + meal ideas

A simple mince meat pattie with eggs is an easy one, add avocado or mushroom, some low sugar friends or whole fruit jelly, or bone broth, and you have an insanely healthy fuel source to start the day. We sometimes make and ghee-daise which is so creamy and delicious, and for leaner meat we add raw beef suet packed full of bio-available nutrients.

For other ideas check out our website.

Adding offal is a very good idea and a great way to hide the flavour is in patties! Meat Muffins is a brilliant (and popular) time saving breakfast idea, Meat Waffles are different, there are healthy swap recipes for sometimes-meals like pancakes, there’s a couple of cereal options.. a few things to hopefully inspire you to create nourishing breakfast meals for you and the fam ๐Ÿ˜‹


I hope this information and our perspectives and experiences help you and your family on your journey to better health + more happiness!

Aimee

Primal Health Coach for Women

Visit our website:ย Primal Influenceย 

Follow us on socials:ย Facebookย +ย Instagram + TikTok

Disclaimer:

This disclaimer governs your use of Under the Primal Influence Blog. By using this website, you accept this disclaimer in full. If you disagree with any part of this disclaimer, do not use Under the Primal Influence Blog or any affiliated websites, properties, or companies. We reserve the right to modify these terms at any time. You should therefore check back periodically for changes. By using this website after we post any changes, you agree to accept those changes, whether or not you have reviewed them.

All information and resources found on Under the Primal Influence Blog are based on the opinions of the author unless otherwise noted. All information is intended to motivate readers to make their own nutrition and health decisions after consulting with their health care provider. I am not a doctor, lawyer, psychiatrist, therapist, or your mother, and I donโ€™t play one on the internet.

The author of this site encourages you to consult a doctor before making any health changes, especially any changes related to a specific diagnosis or condition. No information on this site should be relied upon to determine diet, make a medical diagnosis, or determine treatment for a medical condition. The information on this website is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional and is not intended as medical advice.

NO information on this site should be used to diagnose, treat, prevent or cure any disease or condition.

None of the posts and articles on Under the Primal Influence Blog may be re-printed without express written permission of the author. Primal Influence will respond to written requests to re-print parts of posts and excerpts/quotes (10% or less) may be reprinted with attribution as long as all links are left intact.

Healthy Flour Options

Swapping grain + pseudo grain flours for healthy alternatives.

This is further to a recent post we did all about grains and why they’re not healthy for us on a regular basis.

โ“ Why are grain flours not great? What even are ‘pseudo’ grains? What healthy alternatives are there and how do they stack up against the regular flours? What are some healthy flour recipes?

I cover all this + more in this post PLUS some bonus info including a brand new recipe! AND a special e-book offer!


Pseudo Grains: What you knead to know

And the puns have begun!! ๐Ÿคฃ

Less bad but not good: pseudo grains.

“Grains are not only nutritionally unnecessary, but even downright harmful, packed with toxic antinutrients and inflammatory proteins like gluten. Pseudo grains are foods that resemble grains from the perspective of the person eating them, but are not biologically members of the same group. Biologically speaking, cereal grains are the seeds of grasses, and belong to a group called monocots. In contrast, pseudo grains are the seeds of broadleaf plants, and belong to a different group called dicots.”

List of pseudo grains:

Amaranth
Buckwheat
Quinoa
Kaรฑiwa

Amaranth and quinoa have been cultivated as staple crops in the Americas since well before the first European explorers arrived on the continent. Spanish conquistadors prohibited the cultivation of these pseudo grains due to their role in pagan religious ceremonies, but this ban didnโ€™t last beyond the colonial era. First cultivated in central Asia, buckwheat faced no such challenge from religious enemies: it spread to Europe unopposed, but then decreased in agricultural importance as farmers concentrated on other cereal grains. Although none of them are as common as cereal grains like wheat and corn, they’ve have become increasingly popular in recent years as more people become aware of gluten intolerance and celiac disease as serious problems. Pseudo grains appear to be superior to cereal grains in several ways…” – Paleo Leap

But at the end of the day they’re plants and they have natural in-built defences (AKA Toxins) which do not agree with the human gut. They may be technically higher in some nutrients but that doesn’t mean those nutrients absorb well wen we consume them. Some of them can be OK transition flours for families but there are definitely grain-free options to consider.


Sifting through the grain flour alternatives

The transition to grain-free primal eating used to be damn hard. I did it in about 2010 and struggled to enjoy cooking, baking and healthy eating. Our meals were mostly pretty boring, and any time I did use a grain-free flour, one of very few to choose from at the time, the dishes often didn’t taste great or have nice texture.

The main flour at the time was coconut. That was the go-to flour and it was not easy to work with! Experimentation and practice helped, oh and a tonne of eggs usually, but eventually more options because available and life in the kitchen got a bit easier.

Let’s look at the main grain-free flour options:

Almond meal
Green banana
Sweet potato
Cauliflower
Tapioca and arrowroot
Cassava
Tigernut
Cricket

Macro Cricket Protein Powder 100g | Woolworths
What Is Tiger Nut Flour?
Tigernuts, flour and milk
Cassava Flour Is Best Gluten-Free Baking Substitute | Eat ...
Cassava root and flour

Have you even heard of all of those let alone tried to use them?! I haven’t even tried them all but from all my primal cooking experience I can imagine how some would work, and knowing their potential effect on the gut and health, they’re not necessarily worth trying.

Which of these have you heard of, used, like, hate?


The alternative flours raising the bar in baking

“Raise”, get it?! I just can’t help myself haha

Anyhoo.. which grain-free flours work the best in baking? Here are my thoughts and experience…

Some are made from plant roots or fruit so they’re very starchy and really high in carbs (sweet potato, tapioca, green banana flour, coconut, cassava, arrowroot), with some being quite difficult to work with in terms of straight swap for grain flours. Tapioca and arrowroot, for me, are great additions to cooking and baking with green banana and coconut flour because they act as binders. They actually replace corn starch in primal recipes as well.

I haven’t tried sweet potato or cauli flours yet but plan to this week to include my thoughts in the newsletter, seeing as they’re now available in supermarkets.

Almond meal is high in fat and works well in baking but unfortunately is probably the most unhealthy because nuts are best consumed only in very small quantities and activated (soaked) to try and reduce the high toxin content. I occasionally make a cake or similar using almond meal but my tummy never likes it.

Coconut and green banana flours are probably the least carby and starchy of the fruit and root options, but absorb a fair bit of liquid (especially coconut) and require adjustments in the qty of other ingredients in cooking such as liquids, oils and eggs. Coconut is much more fibrous and can dry out in baking. Green banana flour is dry also but in a less fibre-way, and makes great biscuits, crackers, cakes and more.

Tigernut is known to be really tough on digestion and I’ve actually seen people have allergic reactions to it so it’s not one I’d recommend using often but could be worth trying.

Cricket flour is a plant-free option made from roasted ground crickets. It’s a lot harder to use as a baking flour but makes a great meat and fish coating option or a protein-rich addition along with other flours. It’s available from supermarkets and health food stores and is a really rich, nutty kind of flour.

Which of these have you tried or want to try?


Which healthy flour dough I like the most?

My absolute fave Primal-friendly flour to cook with is green banana flour.

I became addicted to it years ago when our good friend and paleo chef extraordinaire Dan from Canberra was visiting for a few days and showed me how to use it. He taught me recipes he liked to make with it including crepes, and I spent the next 1.5 yrs experimenting with it, getting familiar with it, and ended up creating the world’s first paleo GBF recipe e-books!

It’s a staple ingredient in our pantry, I use it for cooking, baking, coating, it’s super versatile. It’s great on it’s own or combined with other flours/powders, depending on the dish. It works in savoury and sweet recipes. I’d never recommend eating it daily, unless it’s a transition flour, but a few times a week can be fine for most people.

In terms of pros and cons I think it has far less cons than most primal-friendly flours, especially with regards to nutrition. It can be tricky to use at first, that’s why my recipes can be really helpful to get started with it without wasting time and money.

As a subscriber you receive special access to purchasing the first ever Paleo Green Banana Flour Recipe E-books!

๐Ÿ‘‰ Click here to see the recipe lists + to buy


Recipe ideas + bonus new recipe!

As I said above, green banana flour is incredibly versatile, but if you’re not used to how it works with other ingredients and when cooking with it then it’s handy to start with tried and tested recipes. Like mine! If you want to of course…!

If you have used it before and not had great success you might be surprised to know it makes a very fluffy bread! And that’s without using a whole carton of eggs!! ๐Ÿ˜ฎ

Here’s a list of all my fave Primal ways to use GBF:

– New York-style pizza base
– Breads and loaves (sweet or savoury)
– Herb crackers
– Sweet tart bases
– Cereal (porridge and regular crunchy kind)
– Coating fish, chicken and pork pieces

๐Ÿ‘‰ There are some recipes on our website you can use


โœจโœจโœจ SPECIAL BRAND NEW RECIPE: Homemade Healthy Cereal!

This recipe is great for those occasional mornings you really feel like a bowl of cereal, or for family members to have daily for a while during the Primal transition period away from grains.

๐Ÿ‘‰ Click here for the recipe


I had wanted to include my thoughts on using some ‘new’ flour options but due to current lockdown (at the time of creating this post) and not being able to access the products I wasn’t able to try a couple of different flours. As soon as I can though I will and I’ll report on them here with an edit!

If you have any questions for us regarding healthy flour options, email us at info@primalinfluence.com or comment below.


I hope this information and our perspectives and experiences help you and your family on your journey to better health + more happiness!

Aimee

Primal Health Coach

Visit our website: Primal Influence | Follow us on socials: Facebook + Instagram

Disclaimer:

This disclaimer governs your use of Under the Primal Influence Blog. By using this website, you accept this disclaimer in full. If you disagree with any part of this disclaimer, do not use Under the Primal Influence Blog or any affiliated websites, properties, or companies. We reserve the right to modify these terms at any time. You should therefore check back periodically for changes. By using this website after we post any changes, you agree to accept those changes, whether or not you have reviewed them.

All information and resources found on Under the Primal Influence Blog are based on the opinions of the author unless otherwise noted. All information is intended to motivate readers to make their own nutrition and health decisions after consulting with their health care provider. I am not a doctor, lawyer, psychiatrist, therapist, or your mother, and I donโ€™t play one on the internet.

The author of this site encourages you to consult a doctor before making any health changes, especially any changes related to a specific diagnosis or condition. No information on this site should be relied upon to determine diet, make a medical diagnosis, or determine treatment for a medical condition. The information on this website is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional and is not intended as medical advice.

NO information on this site should be used to diagnose, treat, prevent or cure any disease or condition.

None of the posts and articles on Under the Primal Influence Blog may be re-printed without express written permission of the author. Primal Influence will respond to written requests to re-print parts of posts and excerpts/quotes (10% or less) may be reprinted with attribution as long as all links are left intact.

๐—Ÿ๐—ฒ๐˜’๐˜€ ๐˜๐—ฎ๐—น๐—ธ ๐—ด๐—ฟ๐—ฎ๐—ถ๐—ป๐˜€ + ๐˜„๐—ต๐—ฎ๐˜ ๐˜๐—ต๐—ฒ๐˜† ๐—ฑ๐—ผ ๐˜๐—ผ ๐˜๐—ต๐—ฒ ๐—ฏ๐—ผ๐—ฑ๐˜†

A grain-based diet contributed largely to my severe poor health and chronic pain for many years. Eventually, I transitioned off of them and made it sustainable, so I’m here to help you and your family firstly understand how the staple grain foods in your kitchen are affecting your health and secondly, how to move away from them and feel better.

Wheat, corn, rice, pasta, cereals, cooking grains (barley, millet, rye, oats, etc. + pseudo grains like quinoa), and all products made with them such as bread, pasta, crackers, snack foods, cookies, cakes, lollies and many other types of processed, packaged, frozen, and fresh-baked goods.

All forms of consumed carbs are converted into glucose in the bloodstream. While whole grains and other complex carbs may burn slower than sugars, they still contribute the same, gram for gram, to total insulin production over time.

Just as a quick sugar spike is pro-inflammatory and compromises immune function, a steady insulin trip from regular meals high in complex carbohydrates is also stressful and impacts our health.

Lectins, phytates and gluten are some of the natural defences in grains that the human body does not like at all.

“๐™„ ๐™˜๐™ค๐™ช๐™ก๐™™ ๐™ฃ๐™š๐™ซ๐™š๐™ง ๐™œ๐™ž๐™ซ๐™š ๐™ช๐™ฅ ๐™—๐™ง๐™š๐™–๐™™!” do you know who said that? Clint, back before we were Paleo, in about 2010, when he ate 6-8 slices of white bread daily. But guess what? He did get off bread! It sucked at first but it got easy quickly.

Same for me with oats for brekkie. And lunch. And snacks. I was addicted to muesli and porridge. But I transitioned out of them and over a decade later am doing MUCH better without ’em!

Check out my short video on my experience with grains and how they contributed to me living for a long time in agonising pain and always being exhausted and sick.

Click here to watch

You wanna know something cool? ๐™’๐™๐™š๐™ฃ ๐™ฎ๐™ค๐™ช ๐™ง๐™š๐™–๐™ก๐™ž๐™จ๐™š ๐™ฉ๐™๐™–๐™ฉ ๐™ž๐™ฃ๐™œ๐™š๐™จ๐™ฉ๐™ž๐™ฃ๐™œ ๐™œ๐™ง๐™–๐™ž๐™ฃ๐™จ ๐™ข๐™–๐™ ๐™š๐™จ ๐™ฎ๐™ค๐™ช ๐™˜๐™ง๐™–๐™ซ๐™š ๐™œ๐™ง๐™–๐™ž๐™ฃ๐™จ, ๐™–๐™ฃ๐™™ ๐™ฉ๐™๐™–๐™ฉ ๐™ฎ๐™ค๐™ช ๐™˜๐™–๐™ฃ ๐™—๐™ง๐™š๐™–๐™  ๐™ฉ๐™๐™–๐™ฉ ๐™˜๐™ฎ๐™˜๐™ก๐™š, ๐™ž๐™ฉ’๐™จ ๐™ž๐™ฃ๐™˜๐™ง๐™š๐™™๐™ž๐™—๐™ก๐™ฎ ๐™š๐™ข๐™ฅ๐™ค๐™ฌ๐™š๐™ง๐™ž๐™ฃ๐™œ!

๐—›๐—ผ๐˜„ ๐—ฐ๐—ฎ๐—ป ๐˜๐—ต๐—ฒ๐˜† ๐—ฏ๐—ฒ ‘๐—ฏ๐—ฎ๐—ฑ’ ๐—ณ๐—ผ๐—ฟ ๐˜‚๐˜€ ๐˜„๐—ต๐—ฒ๐—ป ๐˜„๐—ฒ ๐—ธ๐—ฒ๐—ฒ๐—ฝ ๐—ด๐—ฒ๐˜๐˜๐—ถ๐—ป๐—ด ๐˜๐—ผ๐—น๐—ฑ ๐—ฏ๐˜† ๐˜๐—ต๐—ฒ ๐—บ๐—ฒ๐—ฑ๐—ถ๐—ฎ ๐˜๐—ต๐—ฒ๐˜†’๐—ฟ๐—ฒ ๐—ต๐—ฒ๐—ฎ๐—น๐˜๐—ต๐˜†?!

Grains are a cheap and easy to grow ‘food’ source. They have almost no nutritional value (none that are bioavailable anyway), create excess insulin production, contain anti-nutrients that muck around with our digestive and immune function, create systemic inflammation and prevent the absorption of vitamins and minerals in the gut.

Grains have been a part of the human diet for as far back as proof exists of what humans ever ate, but grains back then were not the same as today.

Modern ‘altered’ corn
How corn used to look

Most of what we consume today is GMO (new unnatural versions), produced using chemicals and are highly processed. Ancient cultures foraged for and grew original grains native to their region and had intensive processing methods to remove most toxins. Even so, grains were never a staple, plants in general were short-term food sources in between animal kills. They complimented the main foods, not were the main foods.

The companies who make the products promoted as ‘healthy’ are the same companies who finance the nutritional advice we’re fed (pun intended!). There is plenty of scientific evidence and sound nutritional advice proving modern grains are no good for us.

Today we basically live on grains and it’s having a hugely negative impact on our health. The protein in modern grains is addictive, the other ingredients added to make ‘food’ products are also addictive and harmful, and it can be hard at first to even think about going without, let alone actually weaning off and existing without them.

๐—š๐—ฟ๐—ฎ๐—ถ๐—ป๐˜€ ๐—ฑ๐—ผ๐—ป’๐˜ ๐—ต๐—ฎ๐˜ƒ๐—ฒ ๐—น๐—ฒ๐—ด๐˜€ ๐˜๐—ผ ๐˜‚๐˜€๐—ฒ ๐˜๐—ผ ๐—ฟ๐˜‚๐—ป ๐—ฎ๐˜„๐—ฎ๐˜† ๐—ณ๐—ฟ๐—ผ๐—บ ๐—ฝ๐—ฟ๐—ฒ๐—ฑ๐—ฎ๐˜๐—ผ๐—ฟ๐˜€

But what they do have is built-in natural defences. Toxins unsafe for humans and many other animals to consume.

๐—”๐—ก๐—ง๐—œ-๐—ก๐—จ๐—ง๐—ฅ๐—œ๐—˜๐—ก๐—ง๐—ฆ >> Agents present in grains that compromises nutritional health instead of supporting it. The 4 main anti-nutrients in regards to grains are:

Lectins
Gluten
Phytates

๐—Ÿ๐—ฒ๐—ฐ๐˜๐—ถ๐—ป๐˜€ are natural plant toxins that damage the delicate lining of the small intestine, letting undigested foreign protein particles enter the bloodstream and cause an autoimmune response – commonly known as “leaky gut syndrome”.

๐—š๐—น๐˜‚๐˜๐—ฒ๐—ป, found mainly in wheat, is a highly allergenic type of lectin. Ingestion causes a mild to severe inflammatory response in the body, compromising digestive and immune function. Many functional medical practitioners believe we can all do better off gluten.

๐—ฃ๐—ต๐˜†๐˜๐—ฎ๐˜๐—ฒ๐˜€ bind with nutrients in the digestive tract similar to how fibre does. Excess consumption can easily lead to nutrient deficiency. This is common when on a grain-based diet.

Image source: unknown

๐— ๐—ผ๐˜ƒ๐—ถ๐—ป๐—ด ๐—ฎ๐˜„๐—ฎ๐˜† ๐—ณ๐—ฟ๐—ผ๐—บ ๐—ด๐—ฟ๐—ฎ๐—ถ๐—ป๐˜€ ๐˜€๐—ฒ๐—ฒ๐—บ๐˜€ ๐˜€๐—ฐ๐—ฎ๐—ฟ๐˜† ๐—ฎ๐˜ ๐—ณ๐—ถ๐—ฟ๐˜€๐˜ ๐—ฏ๐˜‚๐˜ ๐—ถ๐˜’๐˜€ ๐—ฑ๐—ฒ๐—ณ๐—ถ๐—ป๐—ถ๐˜๐—ฒ๐—น๐˜† ๐—ฑ๐—ผ-๐—ฎ๐—ฏ๐—น๐—ฒ!

As per my video, grains contributed to my many years of experiencing terrible health and incredibly bad gut problems. Going GF absolutely did not fix my problems or make me any better because I then relied on gluten-free grain foods.

Going Paleo was what helped me overcome my health problems and chronic pain. Healing the body, feeding it bio-available nutrient-rich foods and living more naturally.

Paleo: Nutrition Experts Weigh In - Dance Informa Magazine

If you and your family is pretty addicted to and reliant upon grain foods and can’t imagine going cold turkey off of them then a good first step would be a gentle transition.

๐—ง๐—ต๐—ถ๐˜€ ๐—ฐ๐—ผ๐˜‚๐—น๐—ฑ ๐—น๐—ผ๐—ผ๐—ธ ๐—น๐—ถ๐—ธ๐—ฒ:

  • Swapping to GF breads and cereals to at least get away from gluten
  • Soaking, activating, fermenting some grains / buying soaked, activated, fermented products
  • Swapping some grain bars and snack food products to fresh fruit, GF ham, cold chicken wings, homemade gelatin lollies and hard-boiled eggs
  • Reducing the qty of grain foods each meal to smaller amounts and adding more eggs, meat and veggies to the plate (see previous posts about what grain foods actually are)
  • Using gluten-free flours and products
  • Adding in some healing and nutrient-dense foods to reduce inflammation

This could be done over the period of a couple of months with the aim of moving totally away from grains all-together. ๐™„๐™ฉ’๐™จ ๐™™๐™ค-๐™–๐™—๐™ก๐™š ๐™–๐™ฃ๐™™ ๐™จ๐™ช๐™จ๐™ฉ๐™–๐™ž๐™ฃ๐™–๐™—๐™ก๐™š, ๐™„ ๐™ ๐™ฃ๐™ค๐™ฌ, ๐™„’๐™ซ๐™š ๐™™๐™ค๐™ฃ๐™š ๐™ž๐™ฉ!

Try my recipe using Green Banana Flour
Soaking nuts can remove a lot of the toxins. Image source: Tampa Rejuvenation

The next step would be a 21-day total grain detox/primal reset and learning how to go Paleo with some initial easy transition options and then eventually consuming mostly just the optimal foods.

I wish you well on your less-grains or grain-free journey and am here if you need help or have any questions!

Aimee

Natural Fitness + Lifestyle Coaching | Visit our website: Primal Influence | Follow us on socials: Facebook + Instagram

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Recipe: Immune Booster Lollies

I have experienced some crazy unusual sickness and injury over the last few months. I’m baffled as to why this is so I’m going to try to work it out, and definitely boost my immunity back up so it ends and so I feel well again.

Clint and I eat 90% Paleo, get lots of nature time and I get “nakey bakey” most days (a new name for naked sun time my friend recently came up with. Love it!), so maybe some stress is the underlying cause? Well, whatever it is I know my eating could be improved a little, especially while my immune system is obviously weak.

One of the most popular natural health tonics today is raw juice. We, though, are not fans of regular juicing. Ooh, controversial…! The reason? There are two main ones: 1. Humans need to chew their food most of the time; our stomach enzymes that digest our food need to wake up to be ready for the food to arrive and that happens in the mouth when we salivate and CHEW! 2. Juicing removes a large portion of the essential fiber in the foods blended up. That’s wasteful and not healthy.

But some of the foods that go into making up ‘health tonic’ or ‘superfood’ juices can be pretty darn healing, so why not utilise them in a way the body can better use?

That’s why I decided to make some Immune Booster Lollies! Or “Gummies” if you wanna get technical ๐Ÿ˜‰

These are really easy to make (as are most pure gelatin recipes), can easily be changed to suit tastes and allergies, and are easy to grab from the fridge during the day to get some goodness into the body.

Want to know how to make them yourself? Well alrighty, here you go!

IMMUNE BOOSTER LOLLIES

What you’ll need:

1 cup filtered/spring water

1 cup mixture of diced raw beetroot, carrot, green apple (peeled or not), fresh ginger (the beetroot taste can be overpowering so use less of this if you prefer)

6 tbsp pure beef gelatin powder (grab some from Gelatin Australia here).

Tips: Use half as much gelatin if you’re wanting to make jelly cups instead of lollies.

Tips: Add another tbsp gelatin for really firm lollies, especially if using molds. Use half as much if you’re wanting to make jelly cups instead of lollies.

Optional: Stevia powder or raw honey to your liking, to sweeten if needed.

Do this:

  1. Pour water into a small-medium saucepan, stove turned off, and gently sprinkle the gelatin powder evenly over the surface of the water.
  2. Once all the gelatin is on and appears translucent (this is called “blooming”) you can turn the stove to a medium heat to gently warm the liquid up. Use a whisk to stir as it heats up.
  3. Once all gelatin granules have dissolved pour half the liquid into a blender jug along with the diced fruit, veg and ginger. Blend on high until you have a fine mixture with as few chunks and lumps as possible. If using a sweetener, add it to the blender to combine.
  4. Pour the remaining gelatin liquid in and stir to combine. The more gelatin you blend with food the frothier the mixture becomes and ends up setting with a thick layer of froth. I prefer the texture of a bit of froth, not too much. For almost no froth blend the foods with just enough pure water needed then gently stir the gelatin liquid in. Possibly add a smidge more gelatin to the saucepan if you go with this method.
  5. Once the mixture is blended to your liking you can pour straight into silicon molds or into a square/rectangle container to create a gummy ‘block’ to slice up once set. ย  Tip: if you’d prefer less texture from the food ‘bits’ then simply strain some of the liquid through a fine sieve but keep in mind that’s where a lot of the nutrients and fiber are.
  6. Place in the fridge for a few hours to set firm. Remove from molds and store in an airtight bag or container in the fridge, or slice up the block into small squares.

Grab some to munch on during the day and enjoy the pure whole food healing goodness! Include some in the kids or your own lunchbox (as long as it stays cool), take on road trips, include them at parties.

Remember, these are versatile. Add or remove ingredients listed for others you’d prefer. Pretty much all of my recipes are versatile so you can adapt to your own tastes and needs!

If ALL of my gelatin recipes and all the techniques you’ll ever need to become a gelatin pro, grab my e-book here.

Let me know how you go with this recipe and happy healing ๐Ÿ™‚

Aimee x

Recipe: Sugar-Free Pumpkin Spice Choc Chip Biscuits (Paleo + nut-free)

Clint and I are going through periods of low and no-sugar eating at the moment because we need to for our health. He’s doing 30 days straight of no sugar and I’m 5 days on / 2 days off -ish.

It’s going really well for both of us; we’re each noticing improvements to our health, we’re feeling better, and we’re getting used to some of the swap foods we’ve been eating.

I went live on our Facebook page last week giving my tips for no and low sugar eating, because we’ve been through this quite a few times and can definitely give some advice on how to be successful with it. Watch the video HERE.

Yesterday I felt like baking so I had an idea of a biscuit I wanted to try. ย I know pumpkin puree is a great natural sweetener and binder so I decided to try Pumpkin Spice Choc Chip Biscuits and was very pleased with the result!

They turned out nice and fluffy, quite moist and surprisingly moreish. The only negative… they’re best eaten warm. Not when they’ve completely cooled down as they then become a bit dry and definitely not as tasty. So if you wait until they’ve come out of the oven and have cooled just enough to still be warm inside, or you heat them up gently if they have cooled completely, then they are delicious! And warm biccies are so much more enjoyable in the cooler months, so it’s not a bad thing overall!

Here is the recipe for you…

 

PUMPKIN SPICE CHOC CHIP BISCUITS

(makes 8 large)

 

You’ll need:

1 egg

2.5 tbsp ghee

1 tsp pure vanilla

2 tbsp cacao nibs (as the ‘choc chips’. They don’t taste overly ‘chocolatey’ and don’t melt but give awesome crunch!)

2 tsp cinnamon powder

1 tsp nutmeg powder

1 tsp ginger powder

1 tsp apple cider vinegar

1/2 tsp each of bicarb soda and baking powder (look for gluten-free and aluminium-free)

3 tbsp organic green banana flour (buy some HERE)

1 tbsp arrowroot flour

6 tbsp pumpkin puree (Jap is usually the sweetest)

Pinch of pink salt

 

To do:

  1. Pre-heat oven to 180 degrees Celcius
  2. Make pumpkin puree by peeling and dicing pumpkin then boiling until soft. Strain to remove water, then mash with a fork until no lumps or chunks remain. Let it cool slightly before adding to the other ingredients
  3. Whisk egg and ghee in a bowl
  4. Add remaining ingredients and mix thoroughly
  5. Use a spoon to dollop about 8 spoonfuls worth of mixture onto baking paper on a flat oven tray
  6. Place in the oven and bake for 15-20 mins or until the surface of the biscuits show golden brown colour
  7. Transfer to a cooling rack and allow to cool down just enough to handle and eat safely then serve

TIPS

  • If you’re after more sweetness and aren’t on a low/no sugar eating plan, add raw honey or Grade B maple syrup to the mixture, and/or some chopped fresh Medjool dates. Yum!
  • Add more or less of the spices depending on your personal taste
  • Instead of boiling the pumpkin pieces, roast them instead on a medium heat until cooked through but without dark brown edges. This will add more sweetness and flavour
  • For denser biscuits, leave out the bicarb soda, baking powder and apple cider vinegar. These ingredients help the mixture rise when baking and creates a fluffy texture, so without them the biccies will be flatter and more dense which some people may prefer

 

That’s it, really easy!

If you’d like ALL of my healthy green banana flour recipes grab my e-books HERE.

 

Happy cooking!

Aimee xx

Food + Cooking Coach @ Primal Influence

 

 

Recipe: Easy Chicken Coconut Curry (Paleo + dairy-free)

A great way to enjoy warming, comforting, hearty and healthy meals in the cooler months is to take advantage of energy-efficient and easy-to-use kitchen appliances like slow cookers!

 

One of my favourite dishes to make in my slow cooker is my Chicken Coconut Curry. It’s so easy to make, it’s really versatile, and it’s a great dish for those who don’t enjoy rich and spicy curries. I’ve actually given taste testers of my recipe to people who don’t normally eat curry and they’ve loved it!

 

It’s Autumn here in South East QLD right now so it’s cooling down and feeling like the right time to start making hearty soups, stews and curries. So here’s my Chicken Coconut Curry recipe for you to use and enjoy…

 

CHICKEN COCONUT CURRY

 

You’ll need:

4 organic chicken thighs or 2 breasts, chopped
1 tin Ayam coconut milk
1 large brown onion, chopped
2 carrots, cubed
1 clove garlic, minced
2 tsp ginger (or more if you like), minced
2 fresh organic tomatoes, chopped
1 tbsp organic curry powder
2 tsp turmeric powder
Himalayan salt, pepper to taste
Good cooking fat (ghee, coconut oil, olive oil, animal fat etc.)
Piece of fresh lemongrass
Up to 1 cup bone broth and/or water
Optional: Chili if you like heat, paprika, coriander leaves for flavour and garnish, other herbs and spices of choice, spinach leaves, celery

To do:

  1. Heat oil in a medium saucepan on low, add onions and allow to cook gently
  2. Add garlic and chicken and slowly increase the temp but watching onion and garlic donโ€™t burn
  3. Add carrot to the saucepan along with the spices, lemongrass, any other herbs, salt, pepper, tomato, broth/water and coconut milk to the saucepan and reduce heat to a gentle simmer
  4. Once all ingredients are cooked through, the carrot is soft and the liquid has reduced slightly, remove the piece of lemongrass
  5. Serve by spooning the curry mixture over a flattened heap of cauliflower or white rice on a plate. Garnish with coriander leaves

Easy!

 

Enjoy ๐Ÿ™‚

Aimee

Food + Cooking Coach –ย Primal Influence

Recipe: Winter Warming Porridge (Paleo + oat/nut-free)

Are you like me and miss enjoying a bowl of steaming oats and honey for brekkie in Winter time? If you’re no longer eating gluten and grains and miss oats as an easy breakfast option then you’ll love my healthy porridge recipe!

 

It’s even nut-free, a bonus for those who, like me, don’t do well on nuts, or are allergic to them.

The other bonus is it’s super quick and easy to make! It even has a similar texture to instant oats.

WINTER WARMING PORRIDGE – with blueberries

 

You’ll need:

1/4 cup organic green banana flour (buy here)
1/2 cup organic desiccated coconut + extra for garnish
Pure vanilla, cinnamon and nutmeg powder (to your liking)
Ayam coconut milk for drizzling over to serve (use another milk if you prefer)
1โ€“2 cups spring/filtered water
ยฝ cup organic frozen blueberries
Drizzle of raw honey (optional)

Other flavour suggestions: Grade B pure maple syrup, Medjool dates pitted and diced, grated apple, any berries, slices of banana

Method:

1. In a small saucepan on very low heat add the spices aand stir to draw out flavour
2. Add remaining ingredients and stir will until warmed right through and blueberries have thawed. Add more water if needed until it reaches the consistency you like
3. Transfer to a serving bowl
4. Drizzle honey on, pour on coconut milk and garnish with a sprinkle of dried coconut

 

You can leave out the blueberries and add whatever fruit you like, add chopped nuts if you like, some cacao nibs, cocoa powder for a chocolate porridge bowl… this recipe is so versatile!

Grated apple adds freshness

Time saver tips:

Measure out a few serves worth of the dry ingredients, place in a large jar, shake well and store in the pantry to grab on mornings when you’re short on time. Spoon as much as you like into the saucepan, add the water and any other flavours (such as fresh fruit) you like, stir through then serve. This saves you time getting the dry ingredients together, yay!

To save even MORE time, use clean dried fruit and add to the jar! Such as sulphur-free dried banana, berries etc. ย Freeze coconut milk into ice cube trays and keep a bag of cubes in the freezer so you always have some handy, then use one on top of your warm porridge. Easy!

Enjoy and please let me know what you think!

Want to know more about green banana flour? Watch this video!

If you’d like to grab ALL of my green banana flour recipes my e-books are available to purchase HERE!

 

Aimee x

Recipe: Carrot Spice Muffins with Lemon Icing (paleo + nut-free)

I’m so excited to be launching my TWO green banana flour recipe e-books in October that I’m giving you guys a taste test with this recipe!

Yesterday I whipped up a batch of Carrot Spice Muffins with Lemon Icing and they were so delicious. Clint enjoyed one after work and because they’re full of nutrients, they’re very filling so he could only fit one in. That’s amazing, Clint usually eats a lot!

So it’s good to know that they go a long way, which is handy when you’re spending a bit more cash on the ingredients, compared to conventional baking ingredients.

As with most of my recipes, this one is free from nuts as well as the usual inflammatory suspects like gluten, grains and dairy. But it’s not missing flavour, the most important element! I love that by using quality ingredients, just real food, and utilising herbs and spices, dishes can be full of flavour without compromising on health.

I won’t waffle on anymore, here’s the recipe for you…

carrot-spice-muffins-w-lemon-icing

CARROT SPICE MUFFINS WITH LEMON ICING

You’ll need:

Muffins:

1/2 cup green banana flour (buy some here)

1/4 cup coconut flour (buy some here)

1 tsp pure vanilla (paste, powder, bean)

1 tsp combination baking powder and bicarb soda (look for brands free from aluminium, gluten and rice)

1 tsp organic nutmeg

2 tsp organic cinnamon powder

2 tsp organic ginger powder

1 cup firmly packed grated organic carrot

2 tbsp raw honey

4 tbsp coconut oil (liquified)

2 pastured eggs

1 tsp apple cider vinegar

 

(FYI: organic herbs and spices make a huge difference when it comes to adding flavour!)

Icing:

(I recommend you purchase a stick blender for making the icing, or use a small bullet blender, but anything larger will make it difficult to achieve the desired consistency because the creamed coconut is so firm)

1 tbsp raw honey

3 tbsp creamed coconutย (buy some here)

2 tbsp fresh squeezed lemon juice

 

To do:

  1. Pre-heat oven to 160 degrees Celsius and grease a muffin tray with a little coconut oil
  2. Sift the flours and powders into a mixing bowl to remove lumps (important for the banana flour)
  3. Add remaining muffin dry ingredients and stir
  4. In a separate bowl add the wet ingredients and whisk then pour into other bowl and stir until the mixture is well combined
  5. Spoon into the muffin tray, to the top of each section (that’s a decent serving size, but you can make them smaller or larger if you wish)
  6. Bake in the oven for 20-30 mins, depending on your oven, until edges are brown and a skewer inserted in the middle to the bottom of one muffin comes out relatively dry
  7. Turn onto a cooling rack and allow to cool down almost completely (a tad warm is fine)
  8. For the icing add the creamed coconut, honey and lemon juice to the stick blender jug and use your stick blender on high speed to mix it thoroughly. Lift the stick blender up and down constantly and stop sometimes to scrap edges and to ensure all of the mixture is combined well. When it’s free from lumps it’s ready
  9. Spread the icing on the cooled muffins, or use a piping tool to make a fancier appearance and texture
  10. Then serve and gobble down! These muffins are best served fresh and with a slight warmness. If you do refrigerate these just take them out and let them sit on the bench for 30min – 1 hour before serving so they’re not too cold and firm. Enjoy!

Optional extras: if you do want to add nuts to this for crunch then walnuts and pecans would be nice. Also some natural organic sultanas/raisins would be a tasty and sweet addition.

Remember you can add more or less spices and honey depending on your taste, this recipe is not strict!

Note: the ingredient purchase links above are affiliate links, we only affiliate with products and companies we 100% trust and believe in.

Please let me know what you think ๐Ÿ™‚

For a stack more green banana flour recipes pre-order the world’s first e-books using this amazing ingredient HERE !!

banana-flour-ebook-savory

Cooking with Green Banana Flour

banana-flour-ebook-sweet

Cooking with Green Banana Flour

 

Aimee x

 

5 Things I’m Grateful For Today:

  1. Using green banana flour to create really healthy and yummy dishes
  2. The sun shining on this gorgeous Spring day
  3. It’s the weekend tomorrow!
  4. The country music song playing right now and Spotify
  5. My little container garden doing really well right now

 

 

Healthy food at the local show? It really happened!

Hard to believe isn’t it? Healthy food available at the local Show! Well we’re witnesses that it really happened… at the 2016 Sunshine Coast Agricultural Show held in Nambour we provided healthy food!

logo

I was invited to be a presenter in the Heritage Stage area over the 3 days the Show was held for in June. I decided to cook up my new creation… No Nasties Golden Chicken Nuggets with Tomato Sauce! I knew the event would attract a lot of families with kids, and I know how much kids enjoy chicken nuggets, so to provide a healthy alternative to the nasty regular varieties was a privilege.

ag show 1

 

I hosted 3 x 30min cooking demonstrations and had a great time showing show-goers how to make and cook up this really easy and healthy recipe. I received terrific feedback from so many people and gave out free recipe cards so everyone could make the recipe at home.

In keeping with the theme of the event I wanted to really focus on using local quality agriculture. I used Walker Farm Foods pastured chicken breast and thigh fillets, plus produce supplied by Sunshine Organics.

ag show 2

Because it’s such a popular and tasty recipe I’d love to share it with you guys too! So here it is, my new chicken nuggets recipe, enjoy!

 

GOLDEN CHICKEN NUGGETS WITH TOMATO SAUCE

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NUGGETSย  – makes 6 large

 

250g free-range chicken mince (I used breast and thigh fillets food processed to become ‘mince’)

1/2 tsp garlic powder

1/4 cup Natural Evolution green banana flour (avail. via our affiliate link here)

1/4 cup coconut flour

Himalayan salt, pepper to taste

1 tbsp coconut oil, organic olive oil or rendered animal fat to cook in

  1. In a container add mince and garlic and with either plastic gloves on or using a large spoon mix it all together so theyโ€™re combined thoroughly
  2. In a large, flat container add the flours. Stir to combine then pick up about a tablespoon of the chicken mince mixture, shape with your hands then place in the flour mix and turn to evenly coat. Shake off excess flour. Repeat with remaining mince mixture
  3. Heat a small amount of oil in a non-stick fry pan on the stove at medium-high temp
  4. Place nuggets in the pan, turning each over once one side is coated with oil, so the other side is coated. If the pan isnโ€™t completely flat with a raise in the centre, thatโ€™s ok. As long as each side of each nugget is coated with some oil theyโ€™ll cook fine in the centre without the majority of oil touching them. Too much oil under the nuggets can prevent the surface crisping up and cause them to become soggy, so a dry-ish area on the pan is ideal!
  5. The nuggets wonโ€™t take long to cook through. Once cooked place them on a plate to serve, or paper towel for a minute or so if theyโ€™re too oily

 

TOMATO SAUCE

 

1 brown onion, finely diced

1 organic tomato, finely diced

1/2 cup organic tomato paste

1 tsp smoked paprika powder

1 tbsp Niulife coconut amino (avail. via our affiliate link here)

2 tbsp bone broth (free e-book avail. here)

2 tbsp raw honey

Himalayan salt, pepper to taste

Oil/fat to cook onion in

  1. Place the oil and onion into a medium saucepan on the stove at low-medium temp and cook until onion is translucent
  2. Add in the remaining ingredients and let simmer until it reduces to desired consistency
  3. Allow the sauce to cool then use a stick blender (or pour into regular blender) to blitz and remove some or all of the onion and tomato chunks
  4. Serve alongside nuggets in a dipping bowl or pour into a container to store in the fridge. This recipe makes a lot more sauce than needed for the 6 nuggets, so you can freeze batches of it so you always have some to thaw and use.

Enjoy!!

I’ve had parents of conventional-foods-eating kids tell me their kids LOVE these nuggets and would definitely eat them often. That makes me happy!

I hope you and your kids enjoy and benefit from them too ๐Ÿ™‚

Thanks for reading, and I might see you at next year’s Show for more cooking and food fun!

Aimee x

 

5 Things I’m Grateful For:

  1. Finally being almost over the bad ass cold I had all week
  2. Being able to cook for people and teach them healthy recipes
  3. Getting 1hour sunshine today, it felt so good
  4. Sitting by the fire outside in the courtyard during Winter
  5. Aloe vera tissues lol

Recipe: Paleo Meatballs & Veggies with Noodles 2-Ways

I don’t always consume nightshades because I have a bit of sensitivity to them, so I often enjoy creating variety with meals totally leaving out tomato, chilli, garlic, paprika.. basically all the good stuff lol and finding flavour without those common flavour options.

As most of you know, I also like to create meals that are quick, easy and super healthy. Sometimes my creative moments actually work out well and the other night was one of those occasions when I created a new meat and veg dish that got double thumbs up from Clint, woo! AND it made 4 meals worth in one go, bonus!

I decided to make meatballs, a non-tomato sauce and have some noodles… and I created Meatballs and Veggies with Noodles 2-Ways – delicious, super healthy, really easy to make, a total win!

Here’s the basic recipe I created but feel free to play around with it and make it work best for you and your family ๐Ÿ™‚

Pumpkin Sauce Meatballs meal

MEATBALLS & VEGGIES WITH NOODLES 2-WAYS

Makes 4 serves

You’ll need:

500g mince (I used turkey, you could use chicken, lamb, beef etc)

1 cup pumpkin, peeled and diced

1/2 cup bone broth (grab our free e-book here if you don’t already know about bone broth)

1 large brown onion, peeled and finely chopped

2 large carrots (peel if not organic), finely chopped

Fat/oil for cooking in (I use rendered grass-fed animal fat, ghee or coconut oil)

2-4 tsp each of cumin powder, coriander powder and turmeric powder

Himalayan salt, pepper to taste

1 large zucchini, ‘zoodled’ using a noodle machine of some kind, or just peeled into long narrow strips

Optional: 1 packet konjac ‘Spaghetti’ noodles (available from supermarkets and health food stores) (I used these because Clint’s not a fan of a lot of zoodles, and these have great texture, more like ‘real’ noodles)

 

Do this:

  1. Make small balls with the mince, by rolling around even amounts into balls in your hands
  2. Heat a large fry pan to medium temp and add the fat/oil, carrot and onion. Place the meatballs in then put the lid on and allow to cook through
  3. In a medium saucepan of boiling water add the pumpkin and allow to book completely through so when you pierce a piece with a knife it easily cuts through. Strain the water and place pumpkin in a food processor or blender
  4. Add the spices, salt, pepper and bone broth to the pumpkin mix and blitz until totally combined and there are no more chunks. It won’t take long to become a sauce
  5. Pour the sauce into the frypan with the veggies and meatballs, carefully stir, place the lid back on and allow to cook for a couple of minutes
  6. Place noodles on plate or in a bowl ready then when the frypan mixture is ready (the sauce should be a little thicker, the meatballs are cooked through, the carrot and onion are soft) spoon it on top of the noodles
  7. Done! Easy!

This made 4 serves so Clint had lunch ready for work the next day, it’s fine to have cold, and I had my dinner sorted for the next night. Yay!

Pumpkin Sauce Meatballs meal 2

Kids will love this ย because pumpkin gives sweetness, noodles and meatballs are fun and it’s a bright coloured dish!

It’s so healthy because it’s jam-packed full of nourishing veggies, a little bit of meat, the bone broth contains gelatin and essential minerals, the turmeric is anti-inflammatory and the fat in there balances it all out nicely.

You could add some coconut amino (with or without chilli and garlic in it) to the sauce to give it a flavour boost. You could use different noodles. You can add different herbs and spices. This recipe is so versatile!

Enjoy! Please let me know how you go and how this idea helps you in the kitchen!

Aimee x

 

5 Things I’m Grateful For Today:

  1. a fun day cooking with a friend
  2. a really fun Primal Fitness Class yesterday
  3. the Daniel Vitalis sleep podcast I listened to while writing this
  4. going for nice walks at sunrise
  5. walking barefoot everywhere and how good it feels